The Art of René Campbell

Artist(s) Drawing
The general art blog of René Campbell, a 20 year-old female currently residing in a little city in South Australia called Adelaide. I study Marine Biology by day, work as a bartender by night, and draw everywhere and anywhere inbetween!

I post my finished pieces of artwork and drawings, sketches, works in progress, photography and thoughts. I will also tend to reblog things that inspire me or what I enjoy. If you want to see nothing but my artwork, you can find it here or through the links below.
NOTE: I do not take commissions at this time and most certainly do not take art requests. Thankyou.

A lot of people have asked me if having a print account, such as Society6, is ‘worth it.’ Of course, it starts out slow as you expose your work and build up an audience. And of course, you only make a small profit from the prints and merchandise sold (however, you are able to choose what your work sells for and thus the profit gained from each sale). Most popular print sites such as Society6 and Redbubble are quite flexible and are assertive towards the artwork of the artist, the quality of the merchandise sold and to the customers who buy the product. In addition, the companies tend to share artist’s work and link to their print accounts on the front of their websites or through Facebook, and even personally contact artists and address questions made by customers.

The $1,633 that’s been paid completely has accumulated since I first started my Society6 account in around May, 2012 (the first image). The $677 pending transactions and the $95 that have been cleared have been all from this month (thanks to ‘I Fucking Love Science’ for sharing my work and linking to my Society6 page, 95% of those sales were made within a few days). So, exposure is a good thing! And often these websites double in another online portfolio and art-based community which is neat.

On my first month, I made $15.60, then got around to the $40-$70 mark (the second image). By this year, I was making over $100-$150 each month and in this last month I’ve made over $700. Most of my sales come from only a few select pieces of work, others are not very popular, which further goes to show what types of artwork are appealing for merchandise.

Another great thing about Society6/Redbubble etc. is that you retain the copyright to your artwork and designs. I’ve been offered to sell my artwork via many small, independent companies (often overseas) that wish to commission me or buy the rights to already existing or future artworks and use them for merchandise. I always decline because I don’t know how my artwork is being utilised and managed. Bigger companies are much more trustworthy and have a huge array of amazing artists that recommend them. I will be adding more and updating my Society6 in the near future and possibly making a Redbubble account as well. Other worthy websites to check out include Behance and Etsy. Here’s another whole rundown on other websites that offer similar features.

So yes, having a print account is worth it if you’re willing to expose your work like you do with any other website and to update it frequently, and of most importance, appealing to a target audience (some things make cooler prints than others, or cooler T-Shirt designs than others). There are some hugely popular and amazing artists on these websites that are so well established with their work and the products they sell, that they make a rather comfortable profit. While these websites probably aren’t enough to pay your rent consistently, they offer a good opportunity to gather cash on the side and to showcase your work as well. 

Edit: I’ve now made nearly $1,000 this month now. Worth it!

Society6 FAQ | Redbubble FAQ

I haven’t worked on ‘Lady Lionfish’ for a few weeks so I decided to do a tad more. I apologise about the lighting, I was using a lamp.
Starting to refine the colours and shapes (compare the left side of the face to the sketchiness on the right).
We decided to go for white on burgandy (the colours here are a bit brighter), but it looks amazing and it feels good to have designed a shirt that ~120 are expected to wear this Friday night! Thanks for your help choosing colour combinations.More art coming, I promise. Back to my essay on shark fishery sustainability!

So ‘I Fucking Love Science’ on Facebook shared my ‘The Fabric of Life’ drawing (with appropriate credit woo!). Since it’s a pretty big hit on Tumblr, Pinterest and now Facebook, I won’t be surprised if I bump into someone randomly that does actually have it as a tattoo.

Hoenn, Hoenn everywhere.

I kind of liked the washiness of this, but the original was very green + blue so I decided to play around with the Curves a little in Photoshop.
eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal
We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!
However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 
The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 
The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.
And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

I feel so lucky to follow so many talented and skillful artists on various websites, Facebook specifically. They’re cool and very nice people and exceedingly helpful to those struggling with art. But my goodness, I swear this freelance business is boosting some of their egos just a tad too much, to the point where the same artist(s) will post a status about freelance almost daily. These posts range from how to deal with freelance and the benefits (good), the scary realities of freelance (not as good but helpful) to judging how other freelancer’s work (not good at all), to making condescending comparisons about other people’s jobs entirely (bad!). They become the epitome of ‘The Workaholic Pedestal’ and could really benefit from reading this post.

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal

We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!

However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 

The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 

The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.

And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

I feel so lucky to follow so many talented and skillful artists on various websites, Facebook specifically. They’re cool and very nice people and exceedingly helpful to those struggling with art. But my goodness, I swear this freelance business is boosting some of their egos just a tad too much, to the point where the same artist(s) will post a status about freelance almost daily. These posts range from how to deal with freelance and the benefits (good), the scary realities of freelance (not as good but helpful) to judging how other freelancer’s work (not good at all), to making condescending comparisons about other people’s jobs entirely (bad!). They become the epitome of ‘The Workaholic Pedestal’ and could really benefit from reading this post.

sluttynuggets:

superhighschoolleveldork:

"digital art isn’t real art!!!!1!!!!".

image

is this a reaction or an example

(via daggerleonelli)

I know this is my art blog and I try to avoid posting anything remotely personal but this kind of stupid, backwards mindset is absolutely infuriating. Although I respect the fact people are entitled to their own morals and opinions, I have almost zero respect for ones like these.Thought I’d share just a handful of shitty comments I found on this particular post so people can rage at the fact that people like this legitimately exist.
So I’ve decided to cull half of the T-Shirt colour combos in half, based on the top 8 choices you liked (and those posted on Facebook). Keep in mind the lineart is cleaner if it’s dark lines on lighter background rather than the other way around (the details get a tad ‘jumbled.’), but light on dark does ‘stand out.’
Here’s the new candidates! Larger view!
Could you guys help me out and vote for your favourite(s)?

Everytime I open up Adobe Photoshop it’s like walking into my home. It welcomes me in with that sense of familiarity you get when your keys unlock your front door. I know essentially where most things are, where they go, and how they work and have done so for about ten years. Occasionally, I notice something I didn’t before or decide to change up my routine, but at the end of the day Photoshop always greets me like an old friend.

Now I’ve opened up Adobe Illustrator and it’s like walking into the home of a sentient alien species living on a distant planet in a different galaxy in an alternate dimension. Time to crack out the tutorials, it’s baby steps all over again.

So here’s my T-Shirt design for my University’s Marine Biology pub crawl. This semester’s slogan is “That Shit Cray” with a crayfish on a beer pint. Also, FYI, FUMBA = Flinders University Marine Biology Association.

The hard part now, is picking what colour schemes to use. The background colours are the actual T-Shirt colours and the print will be one colour. Here’s some mockups that I’ve done, but people are slow on getting back to me on which ones are their favourites.

You can see a larger version here to help you out.
SO, my dear followers, which colour combination do you like best?

rene-art:

The Fabric of Life (Updated)

Flipped the image horizontally so now the chirality of the DNA Helix is correct (so chemists, please stay off my back now, even though I purposely didn’t add in the major and minor grooves because it doesn’t look as good).


Buy as prints, Tees, hoodies and more from my Society6 account!

This somehow got nearly 18,000 notes overnight and I’ve gained about 1,400 followers because of it. And with that, a lot of messages asking if they can get The Fabric of Life as a tattoo.

The answer is yes, as I am humbled that my work is significant enough to be implanted on someone’s body for life. I really do appreciate everyone who has asked for permission, but I can’t always answer my messages and it gets a bit tedious replying ‘yes’ to each one. 

So yes, you can get it tattooed. Yes you can get it modified (for tattoo purposes only). No, it doesn’t have to contain my signature (tattoo purposes only). All I ask is that you enjoy it and send me a photo of the finished result if possible and the tattooist’s details (I’m trying to work up a personal collection of people who have my work tattooed).

A quick welcome to all new followers and I hope you all have a nice day!

Anonymous said: okey i know that you dont take art requests but i think that it would be great see the ninetales drawn by your own hand...

Sadly Ninetales isn’t part of my favourites so I won’t be drawing it any time soon.